Wi Fi Radiation as Dangerous as Microwave Weapons, warns Physicist

 By LUIS MIRANDA | THE REAL AGENDA | JULY 5, 2012

Barrie Trower, a British physicist and expert on microwave weapons warned this week about the dangers of WiFi radiation, which he says, is as dangerous as the radiation emitted by microwave weapons. Mr. Trower is not just a scientist who happened to study microwave energy as a tool for warfare, he dedicated most of his career to studying the effects what this kind of technology has on whoever and whatever is exposed to it.

Mr. Trower completed research for the Royal British Navy and military intelligence regarding the effects that microwave energy, and he decided to leave his retirement to clear up the fog about whether the radiation emitted by WiFi technology is harmless to humans, as other people have said recently. During an interview with the Toronto Star, Trower spoke about the dangers of WiFi radiation and how other household appliances also emit the same kind of energy that is also harmful to all living things.

Previous to Mr. Trower speaking out, an organization called Health Canada had publicly said that WiFi networks posed not threat to human health and that therefore it was fine to install and maintain WiFi networks in schools and other public places often visited by large amounts of people. Mr. Trower shook the validity of the report from Health Canada, by saying that the radiation frequencies emitted by WiFi signals is equal to those used in microwave weapons. In his speeches and meetings with members from Health Canada, Barrie Trower provided documentary proof in paper form where he explains how and why WiFi radiation is so dangerous to humans and specially to children.

In the document, Mr. Trower begins by providing an account of his experience studying the effects of microwave radiation and then describes how these radiation has the capacity to literally cook living things while they’re alive. “The Cold War extended my military education into the full diversity of stealth microwave warfare and communication systems. I was previously aware of reports concerning dead birds in and around communication bases. On examination these birds were found to be cooked.” Trower goes further to explain that microwave technology is the selected mode of communication in military settings because its radio waves are so strong that they are capable of penetrating places where no other form of radio waves can get.

Trower adds that sickness due to exposure to microwave radiation was first seen and reported back in 1932, when it was identified as ‘microwave or radio wave sickness’. Among the symptoms of such sickness, experts have found severe tiredness, fatigue, fitful sleep, headaches, intolerability and high susceptibility to infection. The symptoms, he says, are a consequence of the athermal effects of the radiation; that is, the effects the radiation has without emitting or exposing the victims to any kind of noticeable heat waves. In his document prepared for the Kind of Botswana, Trower cites the example of the US Embassy in Moscow, which was irradiated with low level microwave energy during the Cold War. The consequences of this radiation, says Trower, were multiple cancers, leukaemias and other illnessess that appeared among Embassy workers and their relatives.

Regading the exposition of people and especially children to low levels of Wi Fi radiation, Trower said: “That’s wrong”, as he asserted there are no safe levels of exposure to that kind of radiation. According to his research and the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection Guidelines, children, the elderly and people with poor health are the most likely to have less tolerance to Wi Fi radiation, that is why he considers it inadmissible to promote the installation of Wi Fi technology in highly populated areas or places like schools, where children spend a great deal of time.

Fourty years later after the effects of microwave radiation were discovered and documented, the US Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) documented 2300 research articles that reported over 120 illnesses originated from radio frequency and non-ionizing microwave radiation. This information was obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request and extracts of the documents confirming that the military was well aware of the dangerous effects of microwave radiation, but chose to hide that information to avoid drawbacks to commercial applications. “If the more advanced nations of the West are strict in enforcement of stringent exposure standards, there could be unfavourable effects an industrial output and military functions.”

Barrie Trower says that “children are physiologically and neurologically immature. It takes years for the blood-brain barrier to form, leaving children more prone to cell-leakage from microwave radiation.” He adds that a person’s natural immune system takes 18 years to develop, therefore children are completely unprotected against this radiation. He has visited numerous schools around the world and found that children exposed to WiFi, report the same symptoms reported back in 1932: fatigue, headaches, nausea, chest pain and vision problems.

In the document he provided to the King of Botswana, Trower mentions that his research reveals that both children and women are more vulnerable to disease caused by exposure to radiation such as the kind emitted by Wi Fi and microwave. “Children have less dense bones, immature immune systems and, by virtue of their size, they can act as aerials. Females have more complex hormone based systems to be disrupted than males.” he adds.

Indeed, governments have kept this information hidden for over 40 years now. They learned about the dangers of Wi Fi and microwave radiation for decades and chose not to say anything fearing that the profits that corporations have accumulated through the sale of Wi Fi technology and all the products and services that originated from it. Mr. Trower’s research as well as the documents obtained through the Freedom of Information requests should be sufficient proof beyond reasonable doubt that this technology has been used not only to get people addicted to it, but also to cause mass disease for decades. “They’re afraid of lawsuits if they admit this is dangerous.” Fortunately, they do not need to admit such dangers in order for legal action to be taken. It wouldn’t be strange to see lawsuits popping up as a consequence of Dr. Trower’s revelations. Both governments and technology companies must be held accountable for collaborating with the mass poisoning of humanity and all other forms of life.

Google Cars grabbed Locations of Phones, PCs

by
CNETNews
July 26, 2011

Google’s Street View cars collected the locations of millions of laptops, cell phones, and other Wi-Fi devices around the world, a practice that raises novel privacy concerns, CNET has confirmed.

The cars were supposed to collect the locations of Wi-Fi access points. But Google also recorded the street addresses and unique identifiers of computers and other devices using those wireless networks and then made the data publicly available through Google.com until a few weeks ago.

The French data protection authority, known as the Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés (CNIL) recently contacted CNET and said its investigation confirmed that Street View cars collected these unique hardware IDs. In March, CNIL’s probe resulted in a fine of 100,000 euros, about $143,000.

The confirmation comes as concerns about location privacy appear to be growing. Apple came under fire in April for recording logs of approximate location data on iPhones, and eventually released a fix. That controversy sparked a series of disclosures about other companies’ location privacy practices, questions and complaints from congressmen, a pair of U.S. Senate hearings, and the now-inevitable lawsuits seeking class action status.

A previous CNET article, published June 15 and triggered by the research of security consultant Ashkan Soltani, was the first to report that Google made these unique hardware IDs–called MAC addresses–publicly available through a Web interface. Google curbed the practice about a week later.

But it was unclear at the time whether Google’s location database included the hardware IDs of only access points and wireless routers or client devices, such as computers and mobile phones, as well.

Anecdotal evidence suggested they had been swept up. Alissa Cooper, chief computer scientist at the Center for Democracy and Technology and co-chair of an Internet Engineering Task Force on geolocation, said her 2009 home address was listed in Google’s location database. Nick Doty, a lecturer at the University of California at Berkeley who co-teaches the Technology and Policy Lab, found that Google listed his former home in the Capitol Hill neighborhood in Seattle.

Read Full Article…

Google could be sued for stealing data from open wi-fi networks

International Business Times
July 1, 2011

A judge in San Francisco decided that the company’s actions may have violated federal laws on wiretapping.

Despite Google’s attempts to have the lawsuit thrown out by repeatedly that anyone could have intercepted the wireless signals, the internet Giant could still face prosecution, as it had previously admitted collecting the data by mistake while gathering images for its Street View service.

Since the allegations first emerged, Google has stopped its Street View cars logging wi-fi networks, which previously involved sampling packets of data from wireless hotspots.

Once on unencrypted networks the system was able to access logins, passwords and other personal details and more than 600MB of data was said to have been collected in 30 countries.

As soon as the evidences first emerged, , Google apologised for its action, explaining that blaming a coding error was responsible for the malfunction and it maintained it would , and delete the data, but that did not stop investigations to be launched in several countries.

France fined Google 100,000 euros (£87,000) over the breach and in the US, a class action lawsuit was brought on behalf of plaintiffs from nine states.

During the case, which is being heard in California where Google’s headquarters is located, the firm tried to have the case dismissed on the grounds that the data gathering was inadvertent but the U.S District Court Judge James Ware disagreed and said that just because a wi-fi network was open did not mean it was meant to be public.

“Merely pleading that a network is unencrypted does not render that network readily accessible to the general public,” Judge Ware wrote in his decision.

The fact that Google used some specialist equipment meant it was was liable for prosecution under federal wiretap laws.

Judge Ware threw out several other elements of the complaint against Google, relating to state laws on wiretapping and unfair competition.

In a statement, the company dismissed the claims and said it would consider the latest ruling before deciding whether to launch an appeal.

“We believe these claims are without merit and that the court should have dismissed the wiretap claim just as it dismissed the plaintiffs’ other claims. We’re still evaluating our options at this preliminary stage,” Google said in a statement to the WSJ.