Medical Industry Admits Current Flu Shots are Useless

NaturalNews.com
November 8, 2011

The medical community is in the process of unveiling a “universal” influenza vaccine that it claims will prevent all flu strains with a single jab. The only problem is that, in the process, the system has inadvertently admitted that current flu shots are medically useless because they fail to target the correct flu strain in many cases, and they do not stimulate a natural flu-fighting immune response even when the strain is a match.

A recent report by CBS 11 News in Dallas / Fort Worth explains that researchers from the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas have identified a compound they say spurs the growth of a key protein known as REDD-1, which prevents cells from becoming infected. By injecting this compound into patients, REDD-1 will increase, say the researchers, and thus effectively prevent any strain of flu from taking hold.

But what about current flu vaccines? Dr. Beatrice Fontoura, one of the head researchers involved with the new universal flu shot, explained to CBS 11 that it works differently than current flu shots because it “stimulates our own (immune) response which is already there and boost[s] it to fight an infection.”

In other words, flu shots being sold today at pharmacies across the country do not actually promote natural immunity at all, which begs an important question. If current flu shots do not boost the immune response, then what, exactly, are they good for?

Not much, according to a recent study published in The Lancet. Though the mainstream media widely reported that the study’s findings showed an effectiveness rate of 60 percent for flu shots, actual data in the study reveal that flu shots help about 1.5 out of every 100 adults. This, of course, translates into a measly 1.5 percent effectiveness rate (http://www.naturalnews.com/033998_i…).

And yet, for years, medical professionals everywhere have been hounding the public to get their flu shots or else face horrific sickness and even death. And those who continue to avoid the flu shot based on concerns about its safety and effectiveness have been routinely dubbed “anti-science,” or worse.

Ironically, the CBS 11 piece about the universal flu shot also contains an interview with a woman who admits that she stopped getting the flu shot because it made her sick every single year. Once she stopped getting flu shots, she stopped getting the flu. So why, again, do we even need a universal flu shot?

Stronger, Ever More Poisonous Flu Shot

From the same fear mongers who brought you the H1N1 Flu Shot fraud, now comes the one size fits all “universal” flu shot. Certainly a convenient way to get us all dependent, intoxicated and to make our immune systems even weaker before the next PANDEMIC. Pay attention to the fraud all over this article.

USAToday
July 27, 2011

A universal flu vaccine that protects against all strains may be within reach in the next five years, replacing annual shots developed for specifics flu viruses, the chief of the National Institutes of Health predicts.

Francis Collins told USA TODAY’s Editorial Board on Tuesday that he is “guardedly optimistic” about development of a long-term shot to replace the one “you’d have to renew every year.”

About 200,000 people are hospitalized with the flu every year, and an estimated 3,000 to 49,000 die, making the flu one of the chief causes of preventable death in the USA.

Collins cited the long-term flu shot in a wide-ranging discussion of many advances coming from NIH research. Amid budget debates now underway in Washington, D.C. that could also trim NIH’s $31billion budget, he made the case for research investments that improve the nation’s health.

A universal flu vaccine “seemed completely out of reach only a few years ago,” Collins said. That’s because flu viruses mutate yearly, causing small changes in surface coatings, which make old vaccines obsolete.

Recently however, scientists have found “there are parts of the viral coat that don’t change …. If you designed a vaccine to go after the constant part of the virus, you’d be protected against all strains,” Collins said.

A universal flu vaccine is “not a question of whether, but when,” says Arnold Monto, of the University of Michigan. “I think five years is a bit ambitious, given where we are now.”

Scientists around the world are working on the problem. In February, researchers in the United Kingdom reported preliminary success developing a universal flu vaccine in humans.

Collins pointed to other advances springing from investment in biomedical research:

• Alzheimer’s studies suggest inflammation, rather than brain-tangling proteins, triggers many cases of the dementia that afflicts more than 5million, according to NIH.

• Diabetes research is finding that exercise and nutrition coaching is more effective at checking symptoms than drug treatment.

HIV studies suggest screening everyone in the country for HIV could lead to early treatment to prevent some of the 56,000 new cases each year.

“We might be able to end this epidemic,” Collins said. Given that the lifetime cost of HIV/AIDS treatment is $1million — a total of $56billion to treat just the newly infected each year — universal screening “begins to look cost-effective.” He cautioned there is no proposal for such screening.

NIH already runs pilot programs to test and treat high-risk people in Washington, D.C. and the Bronx, N.Y., says Anthony Fauci, head of NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. “Scientifically, we know it works.”