Brazil rocked by yet another corruption Scandal

A millionaire fraud affects six electoral courts who moved 1.5 billion euros through questionable practices.

By LUIS MIRANDA | THE REAL AGENDA | NOVEMBER 1, 2012

Corruption has never been as closely associated with Brazil as it is today. That is not because Brazil wasn’t sufficiently corrupt in the past, but because given its new position in the world — as one of the fastest growing and most attractive markets for foreign investment — the country has been put more often than not under the magnifying glass. Brazil will host the FIFA soccer World Cup in 2014 and the Olympic Games in 2016 in what seems to be its launch into global relevance. Before, Brazil has only been know for its Samba, naked parading women and extreme poverty.

However, as the country becomes more visible on the world stage, Brazilians and the world are more likely to learn about the depth of the corruption pit hole both at the local and national levels. A few years ago, authorities in Brazil began investigating a new financial scandal involving electoral courts in the State of Sao Paulo. Police kickstarted what they call Operation Pretorium,a sting led by the Federal Police since since 2004.

The goal of the operation was to investigate allegations of fraud at six regional electoral courts, which in Brazil are named Regional Electoral Tribunals (TRE). One of the most serious cases is that of Roraima, one of the 27 federal states of the country. After 8 years of investigations police have apprehended at least six people in connection with the mis appropriation of 3,000 million reais (nearly 1,500 million euros) in a corruption scandal that spreads to five states, including Amazonia and Rondonia.

In a separate corruption case, the Federal Supreme Court  of Brazil — the highest court in the country — condemned 25 people including politicians, businessmen and bankers for their participation in the widely publicized scandal known as the Mensalao, a political scheme conducted by the Partido dos Trabalhadores (PT) or Worker’s Party, which included bribing other political groups to obtain votes that helped advance the party’s agenda in order to make government programs and policies seem successful.

During the investigations conducted under Operation Pretorium, the Federal Police discovered a group within the criminal justice system in six states, which inappropriately made use of  public money to pay for work and services that only existed in their imagination. The investigation began once Brazil’s Attorney General issued request to the Federal Police to look into what seemed to be a scheme to steal public money. The web of corruption included, according to police, several types of illegalities, including overpayments of allowances and administrative omission adopted to ensure that compensation for services was issued even when those services hadn’t been performed.

Although the investigation is still ongoing, it is already possible to determine the scope of the corruption in this new scandal. For example, police have detected ghost tours supposedly taken by judges, which were used to receive compensation and government workers simulating trips away their offices while still being in their cities. In one case, public officials benefited by being reimbursed for airfares paid by the Regional Electoral Tribunal of Roraima on the false claim that they had participated in official events inside and outside the country.

The scandal also includes payments made because of supposedly working overtime as well as for diverting public money for court elections in 2004. The list of fraudulent behavior continues with public workers being obligated to use their own money to pay part of their salaries to relatives of some judges who worked at the TREs or otherwise face the possibility of being fired without just cause.

Although police estimates that the total of money diverted reached about 1,500 million euros, police officers involved in the investigation say that the past 8 years have barely begun to scratch the surface of a scandal that could make the Mensalao fraud scheme look like an innocent mistake. José Francisco Mallman, a police investigator says that this is only the first phase of the investigation and that more revelations are likely to surface.

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Brazil is getting hot. Too hot, too fast

If there is one thing proven beyond doubt during this crisis is that government interventionism in the free market is nefarious.  Developing countries are again and again the victims of globalist inspired management.  Argentina was one notorious case, Iceland and Greece have followed; and now Brazil, a fairly prosperous country in the last decade, is on the way to becoming another victim of artificial implosion.

Financial Times

Brazil’s central bank raised its policy interest rate by three quarters of a percentage point on Wednesday evening in another sign thatBrazil getting too hot the country’s breakneck pace of growth is causing concern over rising prices.

Brazil’s economy expanded by 2.7 per cent in the first quarter over the previous quarter and by 9 per cent over the first quarter of 2009, the national statistics office said on Tuesday. That is much faster than what many economists consider to be the potential, or non-inflationary, rate of about 4.5 to 5 per cent.

“This shows there has been no change in the bank’s position since its previous increase in April,” said Silvio Campos Neto of Banco Schahin in São Paulo. “It is clear from all the indicators that the economy is heating up and inflation is still above target. This is worrying and demands further increases in rates.”

The bank raised its target overnight Selic rate to 10.25 per cent a year, the second three-quarter-point increase at the last two six-weekly meetings of its monetary policy committee.

Consumer price inflation ballooned from a low of 4.17 per cent a year last October to 5.22 per cent in the 12 months to May. Many economists expect inflation to reach 6 per cent by the end of this year, well above the government’s target of 4.5 per cent. Economic growth is expected to be about 6.6 per cent this year.

Mr Campos said he expected the bank to raise the Selic rate to 11.75 per cent by the end of this year.

He said successive interest rate increases would help bring growth back to sustainable levels and predicted the economy would grow by about 4.3 per cent in 2011.

Brazil’s domestic market has recovered quickly from a brief recession during the global crisis, spurred on by a rising consumer class that has benefited from more than a decade of economic stability and low inflation, and from low-cost but effective income transfer programmes.

But the fast pace of growth has exposed bottlenecks such as the poor quality of Brazil’s infrastructure and its heavy tax burden. The rate of investment has risen in recent years but is still short of what is needed to deliver fast, sustainable growth.

Background: Fears of overheating

Brazil’s economy was among the fastest growing in the world during the first quarter, according to figures released on Tuesday that add to fears the economy is overheating and to expectations that the central bank will raise rates again on Wednesday.

The economy grew at a faster-than-expected annual rate of 9 per cent in the three months to March and by 2.7 per cent compared with the previous quarter, according to the IBGE, the national statistics office.

Part of the reason for the growth was an increase in investment, with the rate of investment rising to 18 per cent from 16.3 per cent a year earlier, spurred by gross fixed capital formation, which leapt by 26 per cent year on year, the fastest rate since the IBGE’s current series began in 1995.

“This confirms that the economy is very heated,” said Rafael Bacciotti, economist at Tendências, a consultancy in São Paulo. “The stand-out sectors were industry and services. Employment and wages are also growing strongly and we expect this to continue throughout the year.”

The manufacturing industry grew by 17.2 per cent year on year and the retail sector by 15.2 per cent. Imports also set a record, surging by 39.5 per cent year on year.

The central bank’s most recent weekly survey of market economists showed expectations of overall growth this year rising to 6.6 per cent, the 12th consecutive week of climbing expectations.

But many believe the economy cannot grow at more than 4.5 or 5 per cent a year without provoking an increase in inflation.

The central bank has been forced to act by steadily rising inflation expectations over recent months. Since October, Brazil’s consumer inflation rate has surged from an annual rate of 4.17 per cent to 5.26 per cent in April. However, the central bank’s most recent survey showed a slight drop in forecasts for inflation during 2010, with the average falling to 5.64 per cent from 5.67 per cent a week earlier.

Most economists expect the central bank to announce a second consecutive three-quarter percentage point rise in its policy interest rate, the Selic, at the end of its monetary policy committee’s regular two-day meeting tomorrow.

The committee meets every six weeks to decide whether to change the Selic rate in pursuit of the government’s annual consumer price inflation target, currently 4.5 per cent a year.

If expectations are confirmed, the Selic will rise to 10.25 per cent a year, up from 8.75 per cent when the current tightening cycle began in April.

Brazil Also Violates Civil Liberties

By Luis R. Miranda
The Real Agenda
May 11, 2010

Brazil is well-known by its Samba, wonderful beaches and friendly relaxed people. It is often compared to more developed countries for its size, population and resources. But there is one more way in which Brazil is similar to the so called developed world: It also violates civil liberties. Different from say, the United States or England, police here do not harass citizens that much. However, the violation of their liberties and rights is still done quietly. Brazil is a country with very limited access to information and people here know very little about their rights and duties. This panorama is fertile ground for government abuse and corruption.

The giant of South America has been known to have some of the greatest impunity throughout the years. Corruption runs rampant from north to south and east to west. In a recent survey, it was determined that Brazil is among the first countries in corruption and impunity. Although much of this corruption amounts to politicians providing and receiving large sums of money for political favors, there is more beyond regular bureaucracy corruption. The former Portuguese colony is rapidly adopting globalist measures of population control, much like the United States, England, Australia and New Zealand.

Throughout the last 12 months, a few newspapers have revealed in the back of their pages and in tiny one column articles, the almost compulsory nature of the vaccination campaign against the H1N1 flu, which although it has been proven to be a sham, continues to be implemented countrywide. Fortunately, some people have been made aware of the dangers of the vaccine, and the campaign has not had the results first expected by government health authorities. According to Zero Hora newspaper, only 670,000 elderly got vaccinated instead of the 1.4 million expected in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Less than 50 percent have taken the regular flu vaccination. However, this does not mean Brazil can escape from the control of the World Health Organization. The vaccinations continue to be carried out for different population groups all over the country.

Brazil also uses a form of fluoride in the water supply, a practice largely adopted for its supposed benefits on people’s teeth, but that has also been found to be pseudoscience. Recently this publication interviewed a head chemist at SEMAE, a government organization that cares for the quality of water in the town of Sao Leopoldo, Brazil. With a Master’s Degree in chemistry, she not only admitted she never saw a study that confirmed the claim fluoride, in any form, is beneficial to people, but also confessed that fluoride is put in the water based on the belief it helps to promote oral health. When asked about the dangers sodium fluoride and substances of the like pose to people, she said she never learned anything about that in college or training courses she attended. In fact, fluoride causes tooth decay, mouth cancer and several neurological disorders in addition to lowering intelligence.

The country is in advanced stages of implementing National Identification Cards as well as using Airport Body Scanners. These last two technologies are already being used or will be in force in less than 10 years. In the case of the radiation emitting body scanners, there are several of them in national and international airports. According to the newspaper Zero Hora, from the state of Rio Grande do Sul, beginning in May 2010, travelers who board planes in the cities of Guarulhos, Rio de Janeiro, Recife and Manaus, may be selected as candidates for walk through one of the full body scanners. This measure is taken even though in more developed countries, the use of the scanners raised concern not only for the radiation they emit, but also due to the fact people’s bodies are seen completely naked in the images the machine generates.

According to many civil rights and privacy groups the use of scanners is a gross violation of privacy laws. The images generated from the scanners are saved in hard drives and kept for further use in surveillance. Although authorities in Brazil deny the capacity of the scanners to provide such images, Angelo Gioia, from the Federal Police in Rio de Janeiro, admitted it is a more invasive method of surveillance. Currently, Brazilian laws allow for searches of people when there are founded suspicions of illegal activities, but do not regulate the use of this kind of scanners. Goia believes there should not be any limits when it comes to security. The cost of every body scanner is $170,000. Body scanning technology operates based on the use of millimeter waves over a body to measure the energy reflected back to render a 3D image.Millimeter wave scanners produce,30 to 300 gigahertz electromagnetic waves, something close to what a cellphone emits. The promoters of Airport Body Scanners always cite the huge benefits they provide in preventing safety hazards such as guns, explosives, etc. But the truth is that a pat down or bomb sniffing dogs are as useful or more accurate. Just as it has been done in other countries, in Brazil the use of this technology is presented as an added convenience, so more people receive it and adopt it willingly. Little is talked about the violation to the right to be private as persons and in our property. Added to the convenience, there is another factor injected in the adoption of the scanners: Fear. The threat of terrorism is the extra ace under the sleeve always ready to be pulled out in case people complain or find the scanners to be an inconvenience.

How much terrorism is there in Brazil? Compared to other countries like Ireland, Israel, Palestine, Pakistan or Great Britain, the answer is: nothing. The country has never suffered a major terrorist attack in modern history. The closest to terrorism are the occasional shootings between drug lords and military police in small neighborhoods of Rio or Sao Paulo. So why does Brazil need the scanners? It does not. As in many other countries, the adoption of this technology is all about submission and loss of liberties. In fact, history shows that the most incredible terror attacks have been of the false-flag kind. Trend forecaster and founder of the Trends Research Institute, Gerald Celente, a notable guest in main stream media outlets such as CNN and NBC, believes 2010 will be the year of multiple government sponsored attacks. “It’s the crash of 2010 as we predicted it,” says Celente. “The global economy collapse in March of 2009 when they inflated the markets with fiat money.” Celente predicted the current crisis, falling stock market, civil unrest in Greece and the collapse of Iceland, Argentina, Portugal, Spain as well as the crisis in the United States and the United Kingdom. “Anyone who believes this kind of stuff is beneficial, deserves what they get.” Gerald Celente warns people on what will happen once this kind of policies are fully implemented. Watch this clip at 5 minutes and 30 seconds.

When it comes to the National Identification Card in Brazil, information about it is very scarce. Most people here visit Federal PolicRFIDe offices all around the country to renew their driver licenses or identification and do not inquire or wonder about the new technology used in those documents. In other countries where it has been implemented, the National ID card is rejected by informed citizens as well as pro privacy groups because it contains all information related to the bearer of the card: Social Security number, physical address and a unique identification number that unlocks a wide variety private information such as bank accounts, savings, workplace, voting record, and so on.

In Brazil, the new National ID Card, provides a unique ID number according to the state the person lives in. In the south, people will have ID’s with a unique 10 digit number, in Brasilia, 7 digits, Sao Paulo 9 digits, and so on. The issuance of the new card will begin in October 2010, and it is estimated that every citizen, naturalized and legal immigrants will be part of the database by 2020. According to technology expert Chris Paget, Radio Frequency Technology, the type used in National ID Cards, has been used for years in credit and checking cards. “There have been hundreds of millions of cards issued with RFID. The problem is that people do not know that technology is contained in the cards, and therefore they don’t do anything to protect it” It sounds strange to say the least, that the technology that is supposed to keep us safe, needs to be protected itself. Right now, anyone with an RFID reader can pin point credit and checking cards and obtain enough information to clone it and use it in a transaction. So, why do countries what to literally count and have such a tight control of their citizenry? Dr. Katherine Albrecht, Founder and Director of CASPIAN Consumer Privacy believes there is a massive push for governments to identify and number all of their citizens, and in the process, use technology created by mega corporations which then, would be in control of personal information such as identification number, banking accounts, social security, pension fund accounts, credit card numbers and so on. “We are seeing this in China, where 1 billion people have been issued National ID Cards with radio frequency devices. They are doing the same in Mexico, 1.2 billion people in India…”

According to historian Daniel Estulin, the use of National ID cards along with other technologies is a push for creating a cashless society. “No more money will be needed, because you will have credit assigned to your identification number. The problem is you are not going to be the one deciding how many credit to put on the card. The government will.” Estulin as well as Albrecht recognize the existence of government databases for jobs, credit and crime, and warn the use of National ID Cards will allow for the creation of a worldwide complete database where everyone will be included.

In Brazil, the issuance of the National ID Card will begin as a pilot project in every region. The card will be similar to a Credit Card, with a chip containing information such as the CPF or Cadastro de Pessoa Fisica, voter registration number, fingerprint, or an iris scanned image which will be accepted by the system known as AFIS or Automatic Fingerprint Identification System. This system is recognized worldwide, and is the one utilized by governments in all 5 continents. The resulting number will be a standardized RG or Registro Geral. With this local, regional and national database, Brazil will be one of the last giants in the planet to succumb to the plan to submit to a global registration program where corporations know each and every human being, no matter where they live.

Sources:

Immigration Proposal Creates National ID Card, fingerprint database

https://realagenda.wordpress.com/2010/05/02/dems’-immigration-proposal-creates-national-id-card-‘fingerprints-database/

A Fluoretacao da Agua: O Maior Caso de Fraude Cientifica do Seculo

https://realagenda.wordpress.com/2010/05/01/a-fluoretacao-da-agua-o-maior-caso-de-fraude-cientifica-do-seculo/

Cnet News

http://news.cnet.com/8301-27083_3-10423199-247.html

Gerald Celente, Trend Forecaster

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVonJr9XvK0&feature=player_embedded#!

Shadow Government Film, RFID

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vfpdbxh-8-o

Shadow Government Full Documentary

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=56a_1265516934

Zero Hora Newspaper, Friday May 7th, 2010

“Identidade terá novo modelo em outubro.” Page 54

Zero Hora Newspaper, Friday May 7th, 2010

“Aeroportos terao scanner de corpo.” Page 57

Automatic Fingerprint Identification System

http://www.interoptest-berlin.de/pdf/DERMALOG_Company_Profile.pdf

European Health Council Unveils H1N1 Fraud

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2664587/health_council_of_europe_unveils_h1n1.html?cat=5

Russia Today. Get Ready for the European Double Dip

http://rt.com/Business/2010-05-07/ready-european-double-dip.html

RFID Reader

http://www.cypress.com/?docID=15592

National ID Card

http://epic.org/privacy/id-cards/

CASPIAN Consumer Privacy

http://www.nocards.org/

Daniel Estulin

http://www.danielestulin.com/el-hombre-tras-los-libros/