NATO begins shipment of Patriot Missiles to Turkey

By LUIS MIRANDA | THE REAL AGENDA | JANUARY 7, 2012

A first group of U.S. soldiers has arrived in Turkey on Friday to work on the deployment of Patriot missile defense system that Turkey had asked NATO for to defend against a supposed imminent Syrian missile attack, said the U.S. European Command (EUCOM) .

The Patriot surface to air missiles are long range defense system used to intercept ballistic missiles as they can reach targets at high altitudes. The 27 U.S. soldiers landed in the city of Gaziantep, in southern part of Turkey, about 50 kilometers from the border with Syria. The soldiers began working to install the missile system, said the state news agency Anadolu.

“These forces will increase Turkish air defense capability and help curb the escalating crisis along the border of the Alliance,” EUCOM said in its statement, referring to the tense situation prevailing in the border between Turkey and Syria. “The deployment is only defensive and will not support a no-fly zone or any offensive operation,” said EUCOM.

Turkey requested help from NATO after several incidents in which missiles and bullets from the Syrian side killed and injured several people in Turkish territory. In addition, the Damascus government has fired ballistic missiles, known as Scud, to targets near the border with Turkey, where Turkish-backed terrorist groups operate with the aid of western nations such as the United States and several European nations.

Syria has spent nearly two years mired in a civil war between rebels and the government, a conflict orchestrated by Western powers that seek to end the presidency of Bashar al-Assad. The civil war already  killed more than 60,000 people.

The worst incident occurred on the Turkish side on 5 October when five women died as a result of an explosion in the city of Akcakale, after an unidentified mortar shell fired from Syria landed near a populated area in Turkey. Since then, Turkey began blaming the Syrian government for any and all attacks.

The NATO ally in the region later deployed tanks along the border and responded with its own artillery repeatedly, but since such actions did not end in a massive build up against Assad, the Turkish president decided to ask NATO for a Patriot missile defense system which analysts see as the first step of the establishment of a no-fly zone over Syria, from where more terrorist attacks will be launched by western-backed rebel groups.

NATO accepted Turkey’s application in December so three member countries will contribute to this deployment. Those countries are the U.S., Germany and the Netherlands, with two batteries of missiles each, in addition to its own military personnel to operate them.

Both the German Army as well as the Dutch Defense Ministry said that their respective Patriot will sail for Turkey on January 8. Each country will send its troops later and expects these batteries to be operational in February.

In total, more than 1,000 soldiers of these three countries will come to Turkey to operate these missiles to be deployed in the provinces of Gaziantep, Adana and Kahramanmaras, all in the south of the country.

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U.S. amasses troops and missiles on Turkish border with Syria

By LUIS MIRANDA | THE REAL AGENDA | DECEMBER 17, 2012

As tension escalates in Syria, the U.S. defense secretary, Leon Panetta, signed the order to send two Patriot missile batteries to Turkey, along with more than 400 U.S. soldiers.

“The purpose of this display is to show that the U.S., working with its NATO allies, will support Turkey’s defense, especially threats that may come from Syria,” said Pentagon spokesman George Little , shortly before Panetta landed in Incirlik Air Base (southern Turkey), in a surprise visit. No one at the conference dared to ask why had the U.S. sent troops, weapons and cash before this last shipment.

American missile batteries will join two from Germany and two from Holland and will be operational in late January next year. The Pentagon spokesman did not report where the missiles will be located and only said that the missiles would arrive in Turkey in the coming weeks.

After landing at Incirlik, from Afghanistan, Leon Panneta told reporters traveling with him that the U.S. is working with Turkey, Jordan and Israel to assess the situation in Syria and its supposed storage of chemical weapons. As usual, Panetta showed no proof of the existence of such weapons, much less any evidence that Syrian intends to use them on its people, a claim put out by U.S. intelligence and that the world’s corporate media have been megaphoning for two weeks in a row.

The Secretary of Defense, State and the U.S. President warned of “serious consequences” should Bashar Assad decided to use such weapons against the population. “We have designed various plans to present to the president,” said Panneta. “We have to be prepared.” Up until now, there is no evidence that plans have been drawn by Assad’s regime to use chemical weapons on anyone. In fact, the idea that the supposed movement of the weapons inside Syria is a step forward to launch attacks on Syrians is as valid as believing that Assad is trying to hide the weapons from rebel groups that may use them against the population to blame the Assad regime.

Unfortunately, the terrorist rebel groups do not need to use Assad’s chemicals to pull that one off, since the U.S. and its allies in the region possess enough chemicals to provide to the rebels so they can launch chemical attacks which they will then blame on Bashar Assad’s regime. In a sense, that action would be the perfect false-flag for the U.S. and NATO allies to launch an open assault from air, sea and land.

The idea to send missile batteries to Turkey originated in the country’s complicity on a series of terrorist attacks in Syria, after which its government called for protection from NATO members fearing Syrian retaliation. Such retaliation never came, although Turkey accused Syria of launching missile attacks from across the border. The Turkish regime never showed any proof to support such accusation.

The Patriot missiles deployed in Turkey are ground-air missiles designed to intercept other missiles, with the advantage that the batteries can move quickly and resist jamming. The current model is an evolution that the U.S. began using in the mid-80s, which were used against Iraq in the first Gulf War.

With almost all significant players in Europe recognizing the rebels in Syria as the “true representative” government, the second day of the Brussels European Council meeting, focused its the agenda on foreign policy issues, especially the conflict in Syria and Iran’s nuclear program.

The French president said that the European Union must aim to oust the Syrian president. “Now we have to get him off power as soon as possible,” said Hollande, who recalled that on the ground in Syria, there is a civil war.

Hollande forgot to point out that the civil war was fueled by western powers who have a stake in Syria. France, Germany, Italy, and the United States have all, in one way or another, supported the invasion of Syria and will surely come together if a decision to launch an full scale attack is made.

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