Hope in 2011: People, Civil Society Stand Tall

By Ramzy Baroud
Global Research

When the Iraqi army fell before invading US and British troops in 2003, the latter’s mission seemed to be accomplished. But nearly eight years after the start of a war intended to shock and awe a whole population into submission, the Iraqi people continue to stand tall. They have confronted and rejected foreign occupations, held their own against sectarianism, and challenged random militancy and senseless acts of terrorism.conflict

For most of us, the Iraqi people’s resolve cannot be witnessed, but rather deduced. Eight years of military strikes, raids, imprisonments, torture, humiliation and unimaginable suffering were still not enough to force the Iraqis into accepting injustice as a status quo.

In August 2010, the United States declared the end of its combat mission in Iraq, promising complete withdrawal by the end of 2011. However, US military action has continued, only under different designations. The occupation of Iraq carries on, despite the tactical shifts of commands and the rebranding effort.

However, were it not for the tenacity of the Iraqi people, who manage to cross-sectarian, political and ideological divides, there would be no talk of withdrawals or deadlines. There would be nothing but cheap oil, which could have ushered in a new golden age of imperialism – not in Iraq, but throughout the so-called Third World. The Iraqi people have managed to stop what could have become a dangerous trend.

2010 was another year where Iraqis held strong, and civil societies throughout the world stood with them in solidarity, a solidarity that will continue until full sovereignty is attained.

Palestine provides another example of international solidarity, one that is unsurpassed in modern times. Civil society has finally crossed the line between words and sentiments of solidarity into actual and direct action. The Israeli siege on Gaza, which was supported by the United States and few other Western powers, resembled more than a humanitarian crisis. It was a moral crisis as well, especially as the besieged population of Gaza was subjected to a most brutal war at the end of 2008, followed by successive lethal military strikes. The four year long siege has devastated a population whose main crime was exercising its democratic right to vote, and refusing to submit to the military and political diktats of Israel.

Gaza remains a shining example of human strength in our time. This is a fact the Israeli government refuses to accept. Israeli and other media reported that the Israeli army will be deploying new tanks to quell the resistance of the strip, with the justification that Palestinians fighters managed to penetrate the supposedly impenetrable Israeli Merkava tank. Israeli military chief Lieutenant-General Gabi Ashkenazi, who made the revelation in a recent parliamentary session, may never comprehend that neither a Mekava (or whatever new model he will be shipping to Gaza soon) nor the best military hardware anywhere could penetrate the will of the unwavering Palestinians.

Gaza is not alone. Civil society leaders representing every religion, nationality and ideology have tirelessly led a campaign of solidarity with the Palestinian people. The breadth and magnitude of this solidarity has been unmatched in recent times, at least since the anti-fascist International Brigades units resolutely defended the Second Spanish Republic between 1936-1939.

The solidarity has come at a cost. Many activists from Turkey and various other countries were killed in the high seas as they attempted to extend a hand of camaraderie to the people of Gaza and Palestine. Now, knowing the dangers that await them, many activists the world over are still hoping to set sail to Gaza in 2011.

Indeed, 2010 was a year that human will proved more effective than military hardware. It was the year human solidarity crossed over like never before into new realms, bringing with it much hope and many new possibilities.

But the celebration of hope doesn’t end in Palestine and Iraq. It merely begins there. Champions of human rights come from every color and creed. Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi of Myanmar, The Most Rev. Dr. Desmond Tutu of South Africa, former US President Jimmy Carter and other luminaries and civil society heroes and heroines from across the world will continue their mission of peace and justice, as they have for many years.

These well-known names are only part of the story. There are literary millions of unsung heroes that make the hardship of the years more tolerable, and who will continue to guide us through new years and unknown challenges.

Haiti was one country that was hit hardest in 2010.  The small nation was greeted on January 12, 2010 with a most catastrophic earthquake, followed by 52 aftershocks. Over half a million people were estimated killed and injured, and many more became homeless. The year ended on a similarly devastating note, as over 2,000 people died and 105,000 fell ill (according to estimates by the Pan American Health Organization) after a cholera outbreak ravished an already overwhelmed country.

It is rather strange how leading powers can be so immaculate and efficient in their preparations for war, and yet so scandalously slow in their responses to human need when there is no political or economic price to be exacted. But this discrepancy will hardly deter doctors and nurses at the St. Nicholas Hospital in Haiti, who, despite the dangerous lack of resources, managed to save 90 percent of their patients

Our hearts go out to Haiti and its people during these hard times. But Haiti needs more than good wishes and solemn prayers. It also needs courageous stances by civil society to offset the half-hearted commitments made by some governments and publicity-seeking leaders.

It must be said that hope is not a random word aimed at summoning a fuzzy, temporary feeling of positive expectations for the future. To achieve its intended meaning, it must be predicated on real, foreseeable values. It must be followed by action. Civil society needs to continue to step up and fill the gaps created or left wide open by self-seeking world powers.

Words don’t end wars, confront greed or slow down the devastation caused by natural disasters. People do. Let 2011 be a year of action, hope, and the uninterrupted triumph of civil society.

Ramzy Baroud (www.ramzybaroud.net) is an internationally-syndicated columnist and the editor of PalestineChronicle.com. His latest book is My Father Was a Freedom Fighter: Gaza’s Untold Story (Pluto Press, London).

UN warns climate change could trigger ‘mega-disasters’

The same people who brought us Anthropogenic Global Warming, Climategate, Sustainability and the toxic Green Revolution now warn us about mega-disasters to come due to Climate Change.  Should we believe them?  Should we even pay attention to them?  Yes, but not for their science.  Even knowing all the history of the planet’s climate, they weren’t able -or did not want to- tell us the truth about the Earth’s state of affairs.  Can they be truthful about it now?  NO.  We should be concerned about their warnings because these same globalists are the owners of Laser Weapons and Weather modification technology to make any disaster happen.

AFP

Weather-related catastrophes brought about by climate change are increasing, the top UN humanitarian official said Sunday as he warned of the possibility of “mega-disasters”.

John Holmes, the UN Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs, said one of the biggest challenges facing the aid community was the problems stemming from changing weather patterns.

“When it comes meteorological disasters, weather-related disasters, then there is a trend upwards connected with climate change,” Holmes, who is in Australia for high-level talks on humanitarian aid, told AFP.

“The trend is there is terms of floods, and cyclones, and droughts.”

Holmes, who is the UN’s emergency relief coordinator, said it had been a tough year due to January’s devastating earthquake in Haiti, which killed more than 250,000 people.

He said while earthquakes, such as the 7.0-magnitude quake which levelled the Haitian capital Port-au-Prince, were random, weather-related natural disasters were increasing in number and scale.

“It’s partly the very obvious things like the number of cyclones and the intensity of the cyclones, and the amount of flooding,” he said.

“But is also in slightly more invisible ways — in Africa with drought spreading, desertification spreading.”

Holmes said officials were particularly concerned about places where a combination of factors — such as large populations, or likelihood of earthquake, or susceptibility to rising sea levels — made them more vulnerable.

“One of things we worry about is mega cities could produce, at some point, a mega disaster,” he said.

“Cities like Kathmandu for example, which sits on two earthquake faults, where a large earthquake will come along… and the results could be catastrophic.”

Holmes said while some countries were well-prepared for disaster — such as Chile which was hit with a massive 8.8-magnitude earthquake in February which left 520 people dead — others such as Haiti were less able to manage.

“That’s one of the reasons we want to focus on not just how we respond to disaster, we need to do that, but how you reduce the impact of those disasters before they happen,” Holmes said.

In Haiti, the situation remained serious, he said, with some 1.5 million people living in makeshift shelters and little prospect of this changing soon.

“There are real concerns about how vulnerable people still are, despite all the efforts that have been made,” he said.

Holmes said the need for humanitarian aid was rising faster than resources were available, particularly given the long-running conflicts in areas such as Sudan’s Darfur and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

At the same time, climate change would likely set in chain migration due to drought or rising sea levels or conflicts due to a scarcity of water or arable land in coming years and these would place more pressure on funds.

“So all these things are going to create more problems for us, and we’re really just coming to grips with what the consequences might be,” Holmes said.

“And you can construct some extremely scary scenarios for yourself without too much trouble.

“For example, about what the effect might be of glaciers melting in the Himalayas. Now we don’t quite know whether that’s happening, or will happen, or not. But if it did, what would the effect be on the major river systems of southern Asia?”

Holmes said while a decade ago, climate change was not on officials’ radars, “now it’s on everybody’s agenda.”

“Climate change for us is not some future indeterminate threat, it’s happening in front of our eyes,” he said. “We can see it.”

AIDS: The Greatest Mass Synthetic Weapon

Funded by Congress in 1969 Through House Bill 15090, the AIDS Virus was Created After 1974

By Luis R. Miranda
The Real Agenda
November 5, 2007

Proof that the AIDS virus is man-made and not naturally born, pile on as more information turns public and access to more and moreAIDS documents that reach more and more people become available. The account that the AIDS virus was originally found in a monkey, and that from it, the virus somehow jumped to humans has been debunked; to use a popular term.

The most eye-opening piece of evidence is government documents; more specifically the House of Representatives H.R 15090 from 1969 which details how and when the second branch of government held hearings and funded a project in which the Department of Defense would utilize $10 million to research and create a synthetic virus that would then be tested in humans in the form of an injection.

After ten years of investigation, the virus was created sometime after 1974 and was experimented with by injecting humans as early as 1977. Although in the US the Department of Defense requested the financing and promoted the creation of the virus, entities like the World Health Organization and the United Nations had previously called for a bio weapon of the sort. The World Health Organization (WHO), started to inject AIDS -laced smallpox vaccine into Africans in 1977, while the Center for Disease Control (CDC) injected some 2000 white males with laced Hepatitis B vaccine in 1978.

According to the Strecker Memorandum of 1983, AIDS is a man-made disease, which is not specific of homosexuals, not venereal and which can be carried by mosquitoes. In addition, it is clear that although condoms would help reduce the chances of infection, they would not prevent the at least six types of AIDS viruses available. Dr. Theodore Strecker writes: “The US National Cancer Institute in collaboration with the World Health Organization manufactured AIDS in a laboratory at Fort Detrich, Maryland.” The AIDS virus is a combination of two retroviruses. One is the Bovine Leukemia Virus, and the second the Visna Virus which were injected into human tissue in its early stages in order to see the results.

Dr. Strecker states that the AIDS virus could not be naturally born and that were virologists who worked in the creation of an organism that could exert selective influence in the way the human body fights infection. The possibility was looked into that the virus impaired the immune system so that it could not respond once it made its way into the human body. According to the Strecker memo, the AIDS epidemic was triggered by the mass vaccination campaign that intended to end Smallpox.

The following is an exact transcription of the narrative in the Subcommittee of Appropriations held in July 1, 1969, which involved discussions about Synthetic Biological Agents.

There are two things about the biological agent field I would like to mention. One is the possibility of technological surprise. Molecular biology is a field that is advancing very rapidly and many eminent biologists believe that within a period of 5 – 10 years it would be possible to produce a synthetic biological agent, an agent that does not naturally exist and for which no natural immunity could have been acquired.”

Mr. Sikes: Are we doing any work in that field?

Dr. MacArthur: We are not.

Mr. Sikes: Why not? Lack of money or lack of interest?

Dr. MacArthur: Certainly not lack of interest.

Mr. Sikes: Would you provide for our record information on what would be required, what the advantages of such a program would be, the time and the cost involved?

Dr. MacArthur: We will be very happy to. The dramatic progress being made in the field of molecular biology led us to investigate the relevance of this field of science to biological warfare. A small group of experts considered this matter and provided the following observations:

1. All biological agents up to the present time are representatives of naturally occurring disease, and are thus known by scientists throughout the world. They are easily available to qualified scientists for research, either for offensive or defensive purposes.

2. Within the next 5 – 10 years, it would probably be possible to make a new infective microorganism which could differ in certain important aspects from any known disease-causing organisms. Most important of these is that it might be refractory to the immunological and therapeutic processes upon which we depend to maintain our relative freedom from infectious disease.

3. A research program to explore the feasibility to this could be completed in approximately 5 years at a cost of $10 million.

As it has been documented, the World Health Organization used the Smallpox vaccine to spread the virus in Africa, Haiti, Brazil and Japan. After looking for documents to support the statement, it is clear that the spread of the virus coincides with how this plan was originally laid out. As an addendum, a confidential source in the WHO has revealed that there is “a strong correlation between the proportion of people in different central African countries who consented to the smallpox vaccine program and the proportion of those now infected with AIDS.

In the last fifteen years, the AIDS virus has killed 11 million Africans, which accounts for a total of 80 percent of the total world deaths due to the virus. According to numbers provided by the United Nations, at least 5000 funerals are held daily in Africa for people who die as a consequence of contracting the AIDS virus. Outdated numbers from 2001 show that in Latin America there were some 1.4 million people infected with AIDS, while South and South East Asia combined accounted for 5.8 million people. These numbers are rounded up in the Caribbean, where at least 700,000 people had been infected as of 2000.

Scientists like Dr. Strecker, suggest that the fact that most of AIDS’s victims reside in Africa and Latin America is not a coincidence, as only 2 percent of the affected population resides in Europe. Apparently, the goal of creating a bioweapon such as the AIDS virus was to eliminate a great part of the Africans in an effort to reduce global population to just about 500 hundred million, down from some 7 billion. An example that helps reinforce this thesis is the Tuskegee Experiment. Conducted between 1932 and 1972, the Tuskegee Experiment, recruited some 400 black Americans in an effort to test the effects of syphilis in Macon County, Alabama. The United States Health Services never gave the subjects any clear information of what exactly would be put into their bodies, ans instead were drawn to the testing centers with promises that the injection would help them treat or cure problems like Anemia, or “bad blood”.

More recently, pharmaceutical companies like Merck have been found liable for the death of thousands of people as a consequence of taking drugs such as VIOX. In the latest battle of the people versus the pharmaceutical industry, groups of people around the world, but more specifically in Texas rose to denounce Merck’s intent to make a new vaccine -Gardasil- available to young women between the ages of 8 and 11 years old in order to -according to Merck- help prevent the Human Papiloma Virus or HPV. Parent groups denounced the measure taken by Texas governor Rick Perry who signed a document saying it was the law to take the vaccine. It would later be leaked to the public that Gardasil contains a live cancer virus something produced in a laboratory, which caused several dozen girls to bleed uncontrollably during the term the injections were taken and even after completing the multiple doses. Mothers of the girls appeared in national radio talk shows to testify of their experience and that of their daughters’.

According to Boyd E. Graves, who has studied the origins of the HIV virus for years, the history of the disease goes back at least 100 years. “The United States began a significant effort to investigate “causes” of epidemic diseases. In 1887, the effort was enhanced with the mandate of the U.S. “LABORATORY OF HYGIENE”. This lab was run by Dr. Joseph J. Kinyoun, a deep rooted-racist, who served the eugenics movement with dedication. In 1893, we strengthened the Federal Quarantine Act and suddenly there was an explosion of polio.” On his website, Graves continues with a chronological account of the way how an grand eugenics program grew from scratch. ” In 1945, we witnessed the greatest influx of foreign scientists in history into the U.S. biological program. Operation Paperclip will live in infamy as one of the darkest programs of a twisted parallel government fixated on genocide. In 1946, the United States Navy hired Dr. Earl Traub, a notorious racist biologist. A May appropriations hearing confirms the existence of a “secret” biological weapon. In 1948, we know that the United States confirmed the endorsement of “devising a scheme” in which to address the issue of overpopulation in certain racial groups. State Department’s George McKennan’s memo will forever illuminate the eugenics mendacity necessary for genocide of millions of innocent people.” Programs like the one orchestrated to exterminate much or all of the black population are true for other diseases such as Cancer, Polio, Influenza, and more recently Bird Flu.

Another piece of evidence that reinforces the fact that HIV AIDS as well as other diseases are man-made and not naturally born is the 1971 special virus flow chart, obtained by Graves in 1999. The chart was sent to him on May 15th, 2000 by Dr. Victoria Cargill of the National Institutes of Health. The chart shows how scientists proceeded when experimenting with new viruses. As I have seen it, it is a step by step guide to be followed and the way decisions are made according to the results obtained in every stage of the experiments. The chart indicates how to go through the process of selecting a candidate, how to proceed in order to determine whether a subject has experienced any immunological response to the virus (HIV), to confirming the effectiveness of controlled methods for introductions in critical trails.

It is estimated that if the HIV virus is not stopped within the next three decades, it will indeed achieve the objective it was meant for; it will completely eradicate the black population in Africa and other regions of the world. What is more incredible is that African governments consented in 1974 in Bucarest Romania to the use of the HIV virus on the population. According to Dr. Graves, there are at least 15,000 progress reports filed regarding the experiments with the HIV virus and the US government along with other European counterparts have spent $550 million dollars in the creation and spread of the HIV AIDS virus.

Consulted Materials include:

1. House of Numbers. Brent W. Leung

1. End Game: Blueprint for Global Enslavement. Alex E. Jones

2. “The Strecker Memorandum.” Distributed by The Strecker Group, Eagle Rock, CA., 1983.

3. “AIDS: United States Germs Warfare at its Best with Documents and Proof”. Jack Felder. 1989

4. “Who Murdered Africa.” William Campbell Douglas. M.D. 

5. “AIDS is Biological Warfare.” Tom Bearden.

6. “Smallpox vaccine triggered AIDS virus.”

7. “AIDS and the Doctors of Death: An Inquiry Into the Origin of the AIDS Epidemic.” Alan Cantwell.

8. “HIV infections up in Caribbean. The Plain Dealer.” 2000

Business as usual: UN Personnel hugging most of Haiti’s relief funds

Fox News

The United Nations has quietly upped this year’s peacekeeping budget for earthquake-shattered Haiti to $732.4 million, with two-thirds of that amount going for the salary, perks and upkeep of its own personnel, not residents of the devastated island.

The world organization plans to spend the money on an expanded force of some 12,675 soldiers and police, plus some 479 international staffers, 669 international contract personnel, and 1,300 local workers, just for the 12 months ending June 30, 2010.

Some $495.8 million goes for salaries, benefits, hazard pay, mandatory R&R allowances and upkeep for the peacekeepers and their international staff support. Only about $33.9 million, or 4.6 percent, of that salary total is going to what the U.N. calls “national staff” attached to the peacekeeping effort.

Click here to see the supplementary budget document.

Presumably, the budget also includes at least part of some $10 million that the U.N. has spent on renting two passenger vessels, the Sea Voyager (known to some U.N. staffers as the “Love Boat“) and the Ola Esmeralda, for a minimum of 90 days each, as highly subsidized housing for some of its peacekeepers and humanitarian staff. The tab for the two vessels, which offer catered food, linen service and comfortable staterooms and lounges, is about $112,500 per day.

Under a cost-sharing formula, the U.S. pays a 27 percent share of the entire $732.4 million peacekeeping tab for Haiti during this 12 month period, or about $197.7 million.

The ultimate size of the peacekeeping bill for Haiti this year has been a source of much concern among the three dozen or so of the U.N.’s 192 members who pick up roughly 96 percent of the U.N.’s overall peacekeeping bill.

That concern rose sharply about a month ago, when U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon’s office issued an updated peacekeeping estimate that used a $700 million figure strictly as a placeholder for the final Haiti post-quake number.

The new figures take some of the uncertainty out of that estimate, but even so, the U.N. was taking no chances of raising concerns higher with its new tally; rather than take a new vote on the expanded peacekeeper budget, the U.N. Secretariat simply issued its revised tally as an extension of the previous $611 million allotment it had voted for Haiti.  More…