American Cities will be Sustainable Prisons

By SUSANNE POSEL | OCCUPY CORPORATISM | AUGUST 13, 2012

By 2030 it is expected that an estimated 4 billion people will live in eco-cities, which are controlled environments where sustainability mandates how much water, energy, food and production is allowed in urbanized areas. Targets and restrictions will replace traditional living to keep the land used for habitat from becoming a wasteland and protect the surrounding wildlife.

Global research on renewable energy and clean technology in an international hub will collaborate to overcome human challenges as population become denser.

In eco-cities, private cars will be banned, forcing people to use high-speed mass transit, bicycles or simply walk to their destination. Narrower streets and huge walls to separate the eco-city from the surrounding wildlife preserves will aid in controlling the temperature of the city.

Several cities in America are transforming their existing urban cities into eco-cities that are marketed as “laboratories of innovation and progress”.

In Osceola County, Central Florida, Anthony Pugliese, president and CEO of Pugliese Development Co (PDC) is building an eco-sustainable city called Destiny where the entire landscape will reduce on-site carbon emissions to zero. PDC has partnered with technology companies to mandate LED lighting, solar panels. The city will sustain a population of an estimated 250,000; with 10,000 residential units and 7 million sq ft of commercial space.

Use of gray water to irrigate, electric community cars for every-person use, biomass plant that will facilitate the purchase of energy credits will be the controlling factors that create a sustainable urban development.

PDC has been given recognition by the Clinton Climate Initiative (CCI), former president Bill Clinton’s program to advance solutions for climate change. CCI collaborates with businesses, environmental groups to bring coercive influence on local, national and over-reaching social levels to demonstrate the necessity of reforming policy, decision-making and infrastructure that have Agenda 21 policies at their forefront.

In Cleveland, Ohio, the incorporated Cleveland EcoVillage project redevelops existing areas through partnerships with the city, regional transit authority and private developers. Local residents are subject to Delphi techniques to ensure they cooperate with the changes to their neighborhood.

The EcoVillage is a national project dedicated to displaying green building and transit-orientated development by rearranging urban life to adhere to Agenda 21.

Virginia Tech’s Department of Urban Affairs and Planning located in Alexandria has created an Eco-City Charter and Environmental Action Plan of 2030 that is moving the city toward sustainable development.

They plan on turning Alexandria into an eco-city that is naturally built with environmental sustainability so that the city and surrounding areas function as one ecological system. The social, economic and sense of community will be focused on sustainability foremost; to prevent “problems in the future”.

All across America, sustainable development “cities” managed and constructed under the policies of Agenda 21 are popping up with the assistance of eco-terrorist groups masquerading as grassroots efforts.

One example are the Ecocity Builders , a non-profit organization which is a collaboration of international networks of associates that influence and actively participate in local city planning projects all across the US. Through training courses, they advocate the ecocity approach as the only way to continue in civilized society.

Living in densely populated areas where transportation is limited; the buldings regulate use of water, energy, and waste; while food production is strictly managed by the city planners is where the global Elite want to place every man, woman and child.

In the next few decades, we will see the transition of our home towns into sustainable prisons. The alterations are happening right now in most cities where urbanized living is most congested.

Ultimately, the lies of the ecocities are that they provide “a practical vision for a sustainable and restorative human presence on this planet and suggests a path towards its achievement through the rebuilding of cities, towns and villages in balance with living systems.”

United Nations Religion: Fake Environmentalism on the Rise

The value of a human life will be equaled to that of a tree or an insect. The core of the initiative enacted already in Bolivia was drafted by its communist leader Evo Morales.

Canada.com
April 12, 2011

Bolivia will this month table a draft United Nations treaty giving “Mother Earth” the same rights as humans — having just passed a domestic law that does the same for bugs, trees and all other natural things in the South American country.

The bid aims to have the UN recognize the Earth as a living entity that humans have sought to “dominate and exploit” — to the point that the “well-being and existence of many beings” is now threatened.

The wording may yet evolve, but the general structure is meant to mirror Bolivia’s Law of the Rights of Mother Earth, which Bolivian President Evo Morales enacted in January.

That document speaks of the country’s natural resources as “blessings,” and grants the Earth a series of specific rights that include rights to life, water and clean air; the right to repair livelihoods affected by human activities; and the right to be free from pollution.

It also establishes a Ministry of Mother Earth, and provides the planet with an ombudsman whose job is to hear nature’s complaints as voiced by activist and other groups, including the state.

“If you want to have balance, and you think that the only (entities) who have rights are humans or companies, then how can you reach balance?” Pablo Salon, Bolivia’s ambassador to the UN, told Postmedia News. “But if you recognize that nature too has rights, and (if you provide) legal forms to protect and preserve those rights, then you can achieve balance.”

The application of the law appears destined to pose new challenges for companies operating in the country, which is rich in natural resources, including natural gas and lithium, but remains one of the poorest in Latin America.

But while Salon said his country just seeks to achieve “harmony” with nature, he signalled that mining and other companies may come under greater scrutiny.

“We’re not saying, for example, you cannot eat meat because you know you are going to go against the rights of a cow,” he said. “But when human activity develops at a certain scale that you (cause to) disappear a species, then you are really altering the vital cycles of nature or of Mother Earth. Of course, you need a mine to extract iron or zinc, but there are limits.”

Bolivia is a country with a large indigenous population, whose traditional belief systems took on greater resonance following the election of Morales, Latin America’s first indigenous president.

In a 2008 pamphlet his entourage distributed at the UN as he attended a summit there, 10 “commandments” are set out as Bolivia’s plan to “save the planet” — beginning with the need “to end capitalism.”

Reflecting indigenous traditional beliefs, the proposed global treaty says humans have caused “severe destruction . . . that is offensive to the many faiths, wisdom traditions and indigenous cultures for whom Mother Earth is sacred.”

It is through events like the Copenhaguen Conference that grassroots organizations get bamboozled into falling for fake environmentalism.

It also says that “Mother Earth has the right to exist, to persist and to continue the vital cycles, structures, functions and processes that sustain all human beings.”

In indigenous Andean culture, the Earth deity known as Pachamama is the centre of all life, and humans are considered equal to all other entities.

The UN debate begins two days before the UN’s recognition April 22 of the second International Mother Earth Day — another Morales-led initiative.

Canadian activist Maude Barlow is among global environmentalists backing the drive with a book the group will launch in New York during the UN debate: Nature Has Rights.

“It’s going to have huge resonance around the world,” Barlow said of the campaign. “It’s going to start first with these southern countries trying to protect their land and their people from exploitation, but I think it will be grabbed onto by communities in our countries, for example, fighting the tarsands in Alberta.”

Ecuador, which also has a large indigenous population, has enshrined similar aims in its Constitution — but the Bolivian law is said to be “stronger.”

Ecuador is among countries that have already been supportive of the Bolivian initiative, along with Nicaragua, Venezuela, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and Antigua and Barbuda.