Big Pharma Pills will have Nano devices to track patients

Natural News

The emerging field of nanotechnology is currently gaining a lot of attention across many industries. Nanotechnology allows scientists to manipulate individual atoms and molecules to create unique materials and even micro-scale devices, and this is leading to a wide range of applications in clothing, textiles, electronics and even food and medicine.

Sounds great, right? Except for the fact that, like genetic modification of food crops, nanotechnology tampers with Mother Nature in a way that’s largely untested for safety. And here’s something really bizarre: The pharmaceutical industry may soon begin using nanotechnology to encode drug tablets and capsules with brand and tracking data that you swallow as part of the pill.

To really explain how this works, let me simplify how nanotechnology works so you’ll see why this is so bizarre (and potentially dangerous). Instead of using materials and elements as they’re found in nature to build and construct things, nanotechnologists are deconstructing the basic building blocks of these materials and elements to make completely new ones. In other words, nanoscientists are reconstructing the molecular building blocks of our world without yet knowing what it will do to humans and to the environment.

The long-term consequences of nanotechnology are still largely unknown because not a single formidable study has ever been conducted on this emerging science that proves it to be safe. In fact, most of the studies that have been conducted on nanotechnology show that it’s actually detrimental to health and to the environment (which I’ll cover further, below).

But that hasn’t stopped Big Pharma from potentially adopting it for use in a new tracking and identification system that could be integrated into the very drug pills and capsules that millions of people swallow every day.

By the way, I’ve also posted a video explaining all this. Check it out here: http://naturalnews.tv/v.asp?v=93626…

Nano-encrypted bar code in every dose

Now don’t get me wrong. Big Pharma isn’t the only industry using nanotechnology despite a complete lack of safety evidence. “Nanoparticles” are present in sunscreens, fabric protectors, plastic food liners, and other products. But what’s different about the nanoparticles soon to be found in a pill near you is that they are capable of storing data about where the drug was made, when it was made, and where it has traveled.

It’s a lot like the bar codes used on parcels to track them along their shipping journeys, except that in the drugs, it’s a molecular bar code that people will be swallowing. During digestion of the pill, the nano data bits will be distributed throughout your body and can become lodged in your body’s tissues.

A company that’s introducing this system for pharmaceuticals, says it this way on its website:

“In the NanoEncryption process, NanoCodes are incorporated directly onto tablets, capsules and vial caps. These codes may be associated with an unlimited amount of manufacturer-determined data, including product information (strength and expiration date), manufacturing information (location date, batch and lot number) and distribution information (country, distributor, wholesaler and chain).”

So if you take these drugs, you’ll be swallowing nano “hard drives” that can store data — data that will be distributed throughout your body and can be read by medical technicians who could then track what drugs you took in the past. And what’s the rationale for this? According to the company, it’s to “defen[d] against pharmaceutical counterfeiting and illegal diversion”.

It sounds like a good idea, right? Unfortunately, there’s a whole lot more to this technology than meets the eye.

Editor’s Note: UPDATE 1 — The company originally mentioned in this story now denies what NaturalNews reported. Their own website text as quoted in this story, was apparently misleading, and they now claim they do not use nano “material” of any kind to achieve their nano encoding. We are temporarily removing the name of this company from this story while we attempts to sort out the truth of the matter. In the past, we’ve had many company rush to change their own website text after we ran a story on them. All quotes published in this story were 100% accurate at the time of publication, and we made a good faith attempt to report this story accurately.

Nobel Laureate: “Put virus genes in bacteria and feed them to people”

Xinhua

Barry J. Marshall, Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine 2005 and clinical professor with the University of Western Australia,

Barry J. Marshall

said people might, in the future, be vaccinated by swallowing capsules instead of by using needles.

He made his remarks at the World Expo’s third theme forum, which opened on Sunday in Wuxi, east China’s Jiangsu Province.

“The project I’ve been working on is to develop vaccines that look like a food product. I think that’s the future beyond the needles, to have vaccines look more like food,” he said.

“I worry about my family. I have a grandson. Recently he had five needles on one day. It’s very stressful for small children to have vaccination needles, so it would be much better if we could have vaccines like medicines,” he said. “You don’t have to go to the hospital or doctor, maybe you could go to the pharmacy or drug store or the super market,” he said.

“Ten or 20 years from now, probably many vaccines would be like that, so much easier for so many people not have to worry about influenza, measles, chickenpox,” he said.

“For example, one project we are undertaking showed some early successes in animals. The project is that we can take the influenza virus genes, put them into the bacteria so the bacteria look a little bit like influenza, then feed the bacteria to somebody,” he said.

“You could see in the future this could be like some food product, capsule bacteria. But when you swallow it, it will start living in your stomach for a few weeks. During that time, your immune system will be activated but you will also be vaccinated against influenza,” he explained.

In 2005, Barry J. Marshall and J. Robin Warren was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in recognition of their 1982 discovery that a bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, is one cause of mankind’s most common and serious diseases, peptic ulcer disease.